AFROTC Scholarship Interview

mtrep09

Well-Known Member
I finally finished filling out and sending in the necessary forms to apply for an AFROTC scholarship and am now scheduled for an interview Thursday morning. I'm pretty excited and nervous about it and was just wondering if anyone else had done the interview before? Any advice?
 

Zondaracer

Well-Known Member
Be early, dress sharp, look the interviewer in the eye and be calm, cool, and collected. Most of all, be confident but not cocky. They are looking for a future leader, so they don't want someone who is shy and reserved. If you are late, it will reflect poorly on you, so I would say that is an important point. When I was in your position, i went to the AFROTC scholarship interview early and got the scholarship. I went to the NROTC interview and I got lost because it was in some downtown building that I couldn't find, and I was late and didn't get the scholarship. There may have been other factors, but in the military we say that appearance is reality. Make a good first impression. (don't forget to work on your handshake)

And two questions to think about: Who is your hero and why?
What is your favorite airplane and why?
 

///AMG

Well-Known Member
Not specific to AF, but in general I would be prepared for a few of the following questions:

- What are the most important qualities of a leader and why?
- Talk about a time when your integrity was challenged and what you did
- Why do you want to lead Airmen/Sailors/Marines/Soldiers?

There are of course many others, but I think that hits on the underlying theme of what they need to hear. I would refrain from dwelling too much on the pilot thing....place emphasis on how important being a military officer is to you, as you know and they know that there is a good possibility that you won't end up in a flying job when you pin your bars.
 

Flight81

OO BRO FO
As a former Air Force Officer and someone who went through AFROTC, I can offer some advise.

1. Early is on time and on time is late. Be 15 minutes early! Period. Much more than that is awkward and less than that is cutting it to close.

2. Dress sharp but dont wear a damn suit. Just wear some nice slacks, a collard polo shirt or something along those lines. You want to look nice but not stuffy...

3. Go in with confidence. Make eye contact. A firm handshake. And standup whenever anyone walks into the room and greet them.

4. Here is a big one..... Don't go in with the attitude of "I want to fly or nothing." Big mistake.... By all means let them know that it's your goal to earn a pilot slot and your prepared to do whatever it takes to get it, but also let them know you understand that it may not happen and you will still be happy to lead as an Officer in whatever career field you end up in.

5. Ask questions! Have a few questions ready to ask them. Ask them if any of the cadets are around that you can talk to. Just make sure you show your interest in all aspects of what the program has to offer.

6. Let them know why you deserve the scholarship. Don't be affraid to "sell" yourself.

7. Just make sure you show them you will make a good leader and you will be a person they wouldn't mind working with.

Let me know if you have any specific questions.
 

fish314

Well-Known Member
I did an interview for a slot at the Naval and Air Force Academy, which I imagine is pretty much the same thing as the ROTC interview. (That was 14 years ago, and I'm a Major now, so you can guess that it went pretty well!)

In addition to what was already posted above, I would add:

1. Make it clear that you are doing this because you want to serve your country, (not because you want money for college, or because you want to be a pilot, etc., etc.,). The patriotism angle is probably something key that the interviewer is looking for. You can say, "in addition, the money for college is a great added benefit, and I'm very excited about flying if I can," but you want to lead off with, "I am applying because I want to be an officer in the military. I am proud of, and want to serve, my country."

2. Don't get thrown by unexpected questions. I was ready for the questions about what I wanted to do, my record in school, my extra-curriculars, SAT scores, etc. The question that caught me unprepared was, "what would you do as an officer, if a superior gave you an order that you didn't agree with, but seemed to be generally legal? Suppose instead it was an order to kill a prisoner?"

3. Try to be/act/look/speak professionally and politely. Erase, "Dude", "Man", "Cool" and words like that from your vocabulary until the end of the interview. The military look would probably help, but you don't need to go overboard with it. In other words, you don't need a crew cut... but you probably don't want a pony-tail (as a guy) either! They are looking for clean-cut, well rounded, smart, Joe-american (or Jane-american).

4. You don't need to be totally "HUAH", and in fact that would probably be taken strangely. Aim for positive, interested, and enthousiastic, without being too over-excited. Guys who are IN the Army or Marine Corps sound retarded when they answer questions with grunts and "Huah!!!!!". High School or College kids who aren't even in YET will sound even stranger... and come off as slightly unstable. (Of course, I always thought that the Army and Marines were a bit unstable to begin with...:)).

5. Do some research to show that you've looked into it, but avoid sounding like you know what the military is all about or being a "know-it-all". 99% of what you think you know about the military lifestyle is probably wrong anyways. Trust me on that one. The interviewer will more than likely be able to tell the difference between the correct and the incorrect, but it doesn't matter to you as the interviewee, anyway. They don't expect you to know every in and out to the military lifestyle anyway. They want to see that you've done some research into it, but are aware that it is probably not going to be what you expect, and you are eager about it, even though you don't know 100% of what to expect.

6. You know how a lot of geniuses are total wackos? Like how Van Gogh cut his own ear off? So does the interviewer. Eccentric genius is less desirable than generally competent, smart, above average, but otherwise psychologically normal and stable citizen. This sort of ties in with #4. They want above average, well rounded people, not people who are so far above average in one area that it's made them "strange" in all the others.
 

MikeFavinger

Hubschrauber Flieger
:yeahthat: to the advice listed so far.

I was an Army ROTC instructor and routinely did interviews and sat on scholarship boards, and flight81, fish, and the others nailed it.

The only thing I would add is one thing I always looked for is someone who was well-rounded, well-spoken, and confident. I didn't want the straight-A student who played no sports, and I didn't want the football team captain who scraped by academically.
 

mtrep09

Well-Known Member
Thanks again for all the advice.

I think I'm pretty well-rounded. I have all A's, but also have two years of soccer and several years of cycling. I also have quite a few community service activities that I have done.
 

mtrep09

Well-Known Member
Well, I'm glad that's out of the way. I think it went pretty well actually. Once we started talking I felt very comfortable and the Captain doing the interview was a cool guy. He said I was "a very impressive young man" lol, probably says that to everyone.

Now to wait and see!
 

MikeFavinger

Hubschrauber Flieger
Excellent job. Best of luck.

FWIW, if an interviewee didn't impress me I'd never make them think they did. My guess is you did great.
 

///AMG

Well-Known Member
Well, I'm glad that's out of the way. I think it went pretty well actually. Once we started talking I felt very comfortable and the Captain doing the interview was a cool guy. He said I was "a very impressive young man" lol, probably says that to everyone.

Now to wait and see!
Congrats! And always remember, the winged guys put their pants on one leg at a time just like everyone else.....only difference is their pants help them fly a jet.....
 
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