9 hour 39 minute cessna 182 flight

Stomp16

You mean Shennanigans?!?!
I didn't know the 182 had that much endurance. 9 hours and no stops? I bet he had to pee really bad after he got on the ground.
 

mnixon

Well-Known Member
Sounds like a certain aircraft ferry guy who has more balls than brains that I know.
 

kgflyboy

New Member
That would be about a 1400 nm flight, which is well beyond the published range of a 182. I'm assuming he stopped for fuel. I've heard of people keeping their flight plans open while refueling. This would explain why it appears as one flight on the map.
 

germb747

Well-Known Member
Good point. Perhaps he stopped somewhere in North Carolina, perhaps Raleigh-Durham; you can see on the Flight Aware map where there's a jink to the left around that area. Either that, or he had some super ferry tanks onboard, but I can't fathom a reason to do that flight nonstop.

One of these days, I'm going to fly a C152 into a busy airport and call up for clearance to London Heathrow as a joke. :D
 

PGT

Well-Known Member
One of these days, I'm going to fly a C152 into a busy airport and call up for clearance to London Heathrow as a joke. :D
Cleared to Heathrow as filed, climb and maintain 3,000, expect 4,000 10 minutes after departure :)
 

MikeOH58

Well-Known Member
I met a ferry pilot in Bangor last Friday, and I am fairly certain this is him. Was getting tanks put on a 182 and delivering the airplane to India via the Southern route. Last crossing was a piper 140 @ 7 thousand feet to Germany over the North. Absolutely wild gentleman to talk with!
 

Murdoughnut

Well sized member
I met a ferry pilot in Bangor last Friday, and I am fairly certain this is him. Was getting tanks put on a 182 and delivering the airplane to India via the Southern route. Last crossing was a piper 140 @ 7 thousand feet to Germany over the North. Absolutely wild gentleman to talk with!
Was he a brit? If so - I know the guy. He regularly makes that trip in 182s and Caravans. He offered me a ride up to Bangor once in a Caravan that I totally would have taken if not for work.
 

Barty

Well-Known Member
Good point. Perhaps he stopped somewhere in North Carolina, perhaps Raleigh-Durham; you can see on the Flight Aware map where there's a jink to the left around that area. Either that, or he had some super ferry tanks onboard, but I can't fathom a reason to do that flight nonstop.

One of these days, I'm going to fly a C152 into a busy airport and call up for clearance to London Heathrow as a joke. :D
You guys laugh, but someone has actually flown a trans-Atlantic flight in a 152. They basically had to turn the entire airplane into a flying gas can and it took something like 3-4 hours to reach cruise altitude it was so heavy. Remarkably enough it made it all the way across without a hitch.
 

JoelT

Well-Known Member
I was on the tracks coming back from Europe one day and while monitoring 121.5 and 123.45 I heard a guy asking if someone could relay his position report to Gander. I was bored so, I got on the radio and told the guy I would be happy to. BTW, relaying position reports is not uncommon on the tracks. Sometimes, even in airliners, you can't reach Gander or Shanwick.

So, I tell the guy I am ready to copy his pos report and then he starts reading it off. "N12345, 40N30W, 1200Z, next 30N40W, 1500Z, 11000 feet."

I copy this stuff down but, it just doesn't sound right. So I ask him to repeat his altitude and I also needed his fuel in pounds. He tells me he realling is at 11000 feet and he had no clue what his fuel in pounds was but, it was somewhere in the nine hour area.

Alright, at this point I am really confused. So, I ask him what his aircraft type is. His reply, Cessna 172. And, he said he could really use a backrub.

We chatted for a little while to help ease his boredom. What he was doing just sounded really wild to me.
 

MikeOH58

Well-Known Member
Was he a brit? If so - I know the guy. He regularly makes that trip in 182s and Caravans. He offered me a ride up to Bangor once in a Caravan that I totally would have taken if not for work.
The guy I met was asian, but was meeting two of his friends later in the day who are full time ferry pilots...Very well could have been part of his team. He told me they take off 30% over max gross to make the hop over the pond in the cessna's and pipers
 

Firebird2XC

Well-Known Member
I didn't know the 182 had that much endurance. 9 hours and no stops? I bet he had to pee really bad after he got on the ground.

I've 6+ hours nonstop in a 182. I landed with over a half over left to burn, plus IFR reserve. I wasn't even at max endurance. Just best cruise.

C-182s have long range tank mods. You're a flying gas can, really.
 

milski

Well-Known Member
Well, he's headed to Gander now, so I think it's pretty safe bet that he has ferry tanks. Probably not the guy doing the South crossing though.
 

Firebird2XC

Well-Known Member
Well, he's headed to Gander now, so I think it's pretty safe bet that he has ferry tanks. Probably not the guy doing the South crossing though.
That's kinda cool.

I wonder what kinda range you could get with ferry tanks. Probably stay aloft forever.
 

JK7177

Well-Known Member
It would make sence that he's ferrying it going to Gander and all, thats a pretty common jump off point for a northern crossing if your a ferry pilot from my understanding
 

JLF

Well-Known Member
Looks like our friend is headed for Reykjavik in about an hour. 9+16 flight plan.
I watched this plane at work on Flight Explorer tonight for a little while. If it's the same one(pretty certain)it's registered to Cessna. I was surprised they would cross that much pond at night.

Whooda thunk there would be a whole thread about it? :bandit:
 

ljg

Well-Known Member
From my single-pilot freight in the baron days, I ask how could this guy not go insane from boredom? Amazing.
 
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