777-10

msmspilot

Well-Known Member
Here's a corporate one for you. Picture a Citation I (or 1 or whatever the proper name is) idle on a ramp next to a Citation X. Would it surprise you that Cessna has convinced the FAA that the I and the X are the same plane under conformity so they've never done a full vehicle test for lightning transients since that first I model? It's a long road to get there using the transitive property essentially, but here we are.
How much does an analysis like that from the FAA cost? Asking for a friend.
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
How much does an analysis like that from the FAA cost? Asking for a friend.
LOL.

Look at each citation in order of development. It seems bizarre from the way I write it but if you squint you can see how it happened. Billy Martin was the Cessna guy that sheparded much of that particular certification process and he works on his own now as a der. Id have to guess he bills at 2500 or so a day. It's hard for me to guess I've been out of it so long. A guy i know that taught billy much of what he knows used to bill out around that 3000 an hour 10 yrs ago. Don't take that to mean billy aint worth it, and don't let the aww shucks • fool you, he is a top level talent with a top talent mind.
 

Minuteman

“Dongola”
Ok, hear me out: "737 Train!" All the short-field versatility of the plane you know with practically unlimited capacity.

Sure the up-front costs of having five airframes with five crews might seem high compared to a 777-10, but that's just for takeoff and landing. Once enroute, several crews go off duty and some aircraft shutdown engines. 737 Train!
 

jynxyjoe

The Kickin' Chicken!
Ok, hear me out: "737 Train!" All the short-field versatility of the plane you know with practically unlimited capacity.

Sure the up-front costs of having five airframes with five crews might seem high compared to a 777-10, but that's just for takeoff and landing. Once enroute, several crews go off duty and some aircraft shutdown engines. 737 Train!
1900 could probably banner tow the 737 up in you kept the tanks at half.
 

msmspilot

Well-Known Member
LOL.

Look at each citation in order of development. It seems bizarre from the way I write it but if you squint you can see how it happened. Billy Martin was the Cessna guy that sheparded much of that particular certification process and he works on his own now as a der. Id have to guess he bills at 2500 or so a day. It's hard for me to guess I've been out of it so long. A guy i know that taught billy much of what he knows used to bill out around that 3000 an hour 10 yrs ago. Don't take that to mean billy aint worth it, and don't let the aww shucks • fool you, he is a top level talent with a top talent mind.
Oh, I get it. I was saying that tongue-in-cheek.
 

ahw01

Well-Known Member
Freaking agile.

“Minimum viable product” means “the crappiest thing I can deliver without getting fired”.
We only aim to deliver 60%. We're learning by doing. Paperwork and reporting isn't in the agile manifesto.

Great!
 

Minuteman

“Dongola”
“Minimum viable product” means “the crappiest thing I can deliver without getting fired”.
It's waaay more pernicious than that because it's touted as virtuous. "Only a dope would do anything more than the bare minimum required by statement of work [even if that statement was flawed -- or later discovered to be -- and did not completely align with the customer's needs]." There's the who self-sucking ecosystem of lean-six-sigma kaizen gemba walking that would consider any development beyond the MVP as waste, even trying to learn and adapt during the process [plenty of quotes from Eisenhower, Chruchill, Moltke the Elder and Mike Tyson about "plans"]. And THEN, any development beyond that must be traceable to incremental revenue or, again, that's waste and is a thing to be minimized.

It's a soul-crushing existence if your job is anything other than DMAIC-ing everything around you. But even that has a backside because it becomes easier to find people with no particular skill or talent who see their job as just delivering on what their boss tells them to and are grateful to have steady income, but have no direct or personal investment in defining "success."

Some will tell you that this process will "fail fast" and improve the next time. It won't. By the next time the company swings past this same problem, most of the people that learned anything will have attritted. "Well then why wasn't the process improved?" It probably was, but the business pivoted, or new leadership flowed-down a new "operating system" and entropy reigned.
 
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