2 Killed at Oshkosh

N519AT

Ahh! This is how I change this!
http://www.startribune.com/local/26142494.html


I was actually #2 holding short to depart on the north side of 27 when this happened. Looked almost like cross control, base to final stall/spin. We were told to shut down our engines, waited about 30 minutes and then they moved all of us to 36.

Very freaky seeing the crash though.
 

surreal1221

Well-Known Member
RIP.

Sucks. . .we all have to be extremely safe at these events. These accidents/incidents are becoming common place all for nothing.

These large events need to become like the Masters, or at least a reservation system that can be recycled / flushed every 2 years to minimize the number of airborne attendees.

But of course - that would go and ruin the reputation that all of these large events have - spreading the joy that is GA.

I personally would rather have smaller numbers of the weekend warrior flyer types around, than to see three or four flyers getting killed each event.

Nevertheless, RIP.
 

aloft

New Member
I personally would rather have smaller numbers of the weekend warrior flyer types around, than to see three or four flyers getting killed each event.
Unlikely, considering EAA is made up mostly of "weekend warrior flyer types".

The real issue is pilot proficiency, and what I'd like to see is something that requires pilots who fly less than 50 hrs a year or so to have a flight review annually instead of biennially. Will it help? Who knows. Can't hurt.
 

TXaviator

Well-Known Member
Not sure even what to think about this. Seems like its every year now. Not real great PR for the GA community.
 

Polar742

All the responsibility none of the authority
I've seen 2 happen. I saw 3 friends burn in one. The A300 out of JFK.

The aftermath of a bad decision, and taking a PA-28 into icing conditions.

And the aftermath of a medical issue that came up in a bonanza.

The images remain vibrant, but after time they don't pop up as often.

Sorry you had to witness this event.
 

JumpWake

Well-Known Member
Yeah I got a picture of a crash last year I think of two airshow mustangs colliding! Sad sight.

Amazing picture. I remember that happening...I think there's video floating around somewhere of it, too.


Definitely can imagine the freak-factor was high...sad.
 

MQAAord

Scheherazade
Staff member
Every year........ :(

Many years ago my dad flew (as a pax) into OSH for the airshow with his brother (piloting that plane) and their father.

He said it was one of the most terrifying experiences of his life. This is coming from a man who did 2 years in Vietnam. He's a CMEL, and he says he will NEVER, EVER fly into OSH during the airshow in any airplane ever again. Not as a pilot, not as a pax.
 

yoman793

Well-Known Member
very upsetting, i wonder if it was an airframe failure. homebuilts always make me nervous. i got a ride in a vans rv-4 once and while it was so much fun it hurt, i always thought in the back of my mind, who the hell built this thing....
 

surreal1221

Well-Known Member
Unlikely, considering EAA is made up mostly of "weekend warrior flyer types".

The real issue is pilot proficiency, and what I'd like to see is something that requires pilots who fly less than 50 hrs a year or so to have a flight review annually instead of biennially. Will it help? Who knows. Can't hurt.
None of us are perfect, but I hold a certain opinion that the Experimental Aircraft Association need to make a very strong effort to minimize the potential for these disasters.

It's unfortunate that every event is ending up becoming a killing field for the many who come to enjoy their love for aviation.

An air show is for fun, and the visitors need to have some confidence that they can attend in a safe environment.

I know many things are out of their control. . .but I personally am losing faith in the safety of these huge events (Sun N' Fun, AirVenture, etc)
 

CAP_Flyer

Well-Known Member
I was actually #2 holding short to depart on the north side of 27 when this happened. Looked almost like cross control, base to final stall/spin. We were told to shut down our engines, waited about 30 minutes and then they moved all of us to 36.
About a month ago, I was having a lesson and it was a really windy day. Great day to practice my crosswind landings. As I was turning from base to final, my mind was thinking 'slip' and was setting it up. Next thing I know my instructor took the controls and stabilized us on final. At that moment, I wasn't sure why he did that, but then he explained about cross-controlling stalls and how I was starting a classic textbook cross-control.

If this is indeed what happened to that Lancair, it certainly underlines and highlights the lesson I didn't have to learn the hard way.

Sorry to hear about this happening, but I echo what's already been said. It seems that every year something happens up at OshKosh. :(
 

JoelT

Well-Known Member
About a month ago, I was having a lesson and it was a really windy day. Great day to practice my crosswind landings. As I was turning from base to final, my mind was thinking 'slip' and was setting it up. Next thing I know my instructor took the controls and stabilized us on final. At that moment, I wasn't sure why he did that, but then he explained about cross-controlling stalls and how I was starting a classic textbook cross-control.
While your instructor is absolutely correct about the trap of the base to final spin, if you were in a 172 or 152 I would really not worry too much about it (unless you have out full flaps). As long as your airspeed is good you can slip the bejesus out of that plane in any phase of flight without having to worry about entering a spin. But, once again, you instructor is correct and picked the best time to teach you about it (reinforcement-FOI). It really becomes import in more high-performance airplanes (bonanza/T-34, mooney, lancair, etc.)
 

JA Yawd Bwoy

Well-Known Member
I've seen 2 happen. I saw 3 friends burn in one. The A300 out of JFK.

The aftermath of a bad decision, and taking a PA-28 into icing conditions.

And the aftermath of a medical issue that came up in a bonanza.

The images remain vibrant, but after time they don't pop up as often.

Sorry you had to witness this event.
You saw AA 587 go down?
 

germb747

Well-Known Member
Unlikely, considering EAA is made up mostly of "weekend warrior flyer types".

The real issue is pilot proficiency, and what I'd like to see is something that requires pilots who fly less than 50 hrs a year or so to have a flight review annually instead of biennially. Will it help? Who knows. Can't hurt.
The FAA tried something like that a few years ago. The plan, if I remember correctly, was to make everyone under 400 hours TT take a flight review if they don't fly within 6 months. Too many people complained about it so it was dropped from the final rule.

RIP
 

Sidious

Well-Known Member
The FAA tried something like that a few years ago. The plan, if I remember correctly, was to make everyone under 400 hours TT take a flight review if they don't fly within 6 months. Too many people complained about it so it was dropped from the final rule.

RIP
Interesting how its a mandate for Recreational pilots but the FAA didn't put that in for Sport Pilot which has a much greater potential to grow.


Anyway I'm sorry for those lost
So sad.... :(
 

PWK_Pilot

Well-Known Member
I totally agree with germb747!!

Everyone who flys into OSH should be at their mentally sharpest- and at a higher profiency level- it is a MUST!
If you can't hold airspeed within +/-5kts during slowflight or sloppy at s-turns or not knowing what to do in case of a GA, DRIVE in don't FLY in!

To both accidents in MN and WI recently....RIP

See you guys in OSH tomorow am!
 

Wing_96

Well-Known Member
<Rant>
It's sad, but I expect this to happen every year. How many years in a row can they keep having fatalities? I can't think of another event in the US where you know you are going to have either participants or fans die EVERY year. It's ridiculous!
</Rant>

RIP.
 

tgrayson

New Member
At that moment, I wasn't sure why he did that, but then he explained about cross-controlling stalls and how I was starting a classic textbook cross-control.
That depends. If you were using inside rudder, THAT was a setup for a cross-controlled stall, a skidding turn. If you were using outside rudder, it was a slipping turn and those are cool. I do those all the time and teach them to students. Some instructors get upset at any ball-out turn, so you should discuss both situations with your instructor.
 
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